Visiting The Blue Star Contemporary Art Museum In San Antonio, Texas

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If you want to know more about the Blue Star Contemporary Art Museum in San Antonio, Texas, we have to mention that it dates back to 1986 as the first and longest-running nonprofit place for contemporary arts in San Antonio.

The establishment created a platform for ideas and works from local contemporary artists. Since its inception, it has only grown within the community and produced positive changes in both, the state of Texas and the city of San Antonio.

Today, Blue Star Contemporary continues to be an essential part of contemporary art within San Antonio. There are lots of organizations that are based in this museum that help young artists and provide fair compensation for all the creative work. We can usually see more than twenty exhibitions on a yearly basis in four on-site galleries and fantastic projects of multiple offsite locations within San Antonio.

World-famous artists emerged from Blue Star Contemporary, and we can say that after 300,000 visitors each year, they are experiencing a renewal of artistic perspective in humans and the community.

On-Site Exhibitions

Blue Star Contemporary Art Museum hosts 20 on-side and off-site exhibitions each year

The Blue Star Contemporary Art Museum in San Antonio has an immersive ability to respond to current needs and conversations of the surrounding community. The primary mission is to inspire creativity in all young and established artists through innovative and different contemporary art.

It hosts 20 on-side and off-site exhibitions each year that include well-established and emerging artists who work in a variety of media to provide a full range and depth of contemporary art to people of the community.

We present you some on-site exhibitions that you can see today:

Origins, Rations, Extractions

 

The exhibition focuses on under-observed examples of two South American government’s effects on place and people.

Origins, Rations, Extractions exhibit places its focus on under-observed examples of how South American governments are affecting people from their countries. Gissete Padilla’s family immigrated to the United States when she was in school, which means that she abandoned her long-time friends. Their drawings are fantastic and provide experiences of those who are still living in Venezuela.

At the same time, her work presents a combination and effect on political reality through Chavez dictatorship and the family history of people who live still there.

On the other hand, Paula Luttringer is an Argentinian photographer who took photographs of specific landscapes that were affected by the government policy.

Home Bodies

Home Bodies is the exhibit that features artists whose work and practices were melded and informed by family lives.

Home Bodies is the exhibit that features artists whose work and practices were melded and informed by family lives. Through different approaches, we have 11 artists who will share their experiences as mothers, sons, daughters, protectors, and siblings. The question that lies beneath their work is: How will an artist find the time to be a parent and an artist at the same time? Is parenthood an artistic experience?

If you want an answer to these questions, you have to visit the exhibit that will be a whole next year in Blue Star Contemporary Art Museum. Other works present you how we can combine family experience with our art. Can we understand the effect that brought us the absence of family members and even their presence?

The artists will engage with aesthetics of home and materials from home that include a dining table, textiles, stuffed animals and everything they had around them when they were a part of families. It is a unique moment to check it out as soon as you can! Rest assured, you will not find this kind of a true-to-life exhibition easily that will make you think!